Company Logo

MediasBrowser powered by Mainstream Data

One Poultry, London, United Kingdom. Architect: James Stirling, Michael Wilford and Partners, 1997.

One Poultry, London, United Kingdom. Architect: James Stirling, Michael Wilford and Partners, 1997.
:GSMI-0081-0001
: Oblique view from Queen Victoria Street. One Poultry, London, United Kingdom. Architect: James Stirling, Michael Wilford and Partners, 1997.
:No
:No
:3346 x 5014 pixels
:24/07/2019
:No Restriction
:Grant Smith/VIEW
:29009
:One Poultry
:One Poultry, London, United Kingdom. Architect: James Stirling, Michael Wilford and Partners, 1997.
:Poultry
:London
:United Kingdom
:James Stirling, Michael Wilford and Partners
:Corporate And Commercial
:Office
:1997
:VIEW Architecture
:The building was designed by James Stirling for a site which then was owned by developer Peter Palumbo. It was originally intended to be the site of a modernist office tower designed by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe in the manner of the Seagram Building in New York City, but that scheme was aborted following one of the great architectural and planning show-downs of the 1970s. Stirling's final design is postmodernist with an outer shell of bands of rose-pink stone. The structure was built after his death and is considered one of the greatest masterpieces of the postmodernist style in London. In 2016, following proposals to alter it, it received government recognition with a listing at Grade II*, making it the youngest listed building in England. It is clad in pink and yellow limestone, fixed in stripes and blocks of colour whilst the interior atrium at the centre of the wedge-shaped site displays some of Stirling's characteristic acidulous colour play. Like many notable postmodern buildings, the imagery is rich in references. For example, from the sharp apex of the site a keyhole shaped opening leads to a little-seen Scala Regia with a ramped floor, gold-leafed terminus and ancient Egyptian aura takes visitors into the heart of the building. Intended as site owner Palumbo's private entrance, this space is now little used: Palumbo sold the development before its completion. The turret above is sometimes likened to a submarine conning tower while the glazed two-sided clock is in concept and detail a direct quotation from the Fascist-era Palazzo delle Poste, Naples. "The building makes people smile, it's the slightly naughty child but very much part of the family of historic listed building around Bank Junction – it has the same DNA as Hawksmoor's Saint Mary Woolnoth, Lutyens Midland Bank and Soane's Bank of England," said Laurence Bain, project architect and former partner at James Stirling Michael Wilford and Partners. The building's height, symmetrical plan and divided facade matches the surrounding buildings. Stirling planned it around a longitudinal axis with two similar facades. These are divided horizontally in three and vertically into five, with the layers alternating between angled and curved forms. Both facades have a central wedge-shaped entrance that gives access to the central rotunda, with two arcades on either side.
:One Poultry; architecture; corporate; Europe; United Kingdom; London; Poultry; EC2; 1997; 20th Century; James Stirling; Michael Wilford and Partners; medium group of people; incidental people; Full Frame; general view; day; exterior; postmodernist style; rose-pink stone facade; Grade II* listed; limestone facade; office building; mixed use; retail; commercial; side elevation; striped facade; clock tower; Queen Victoria Street; playful; contrasting; clear sky; sunlit; multi-storey; window wall
:V
:I
:Colour
:6-10 people
:Full Frame
:Yes
:General view
:Day
:Exterior
:Grant Smith
:GSMI-0081-0001.jpg
:www.viewpictures.co.uk